Posts tagged skill gaps
Best practices for keeping success profiles (competency models/capability models) flexible and updated (and not forgotten)

Your competency model should always be in beta.  Competency models describe what someone in a particular role should be able to do to perform their part of corporate strategy.  They paint a picture of what it looks like to be great in a job.  If your strategy is changing regularly (and I believe that for your organization to continue to survive, it will), then your competency model has to change/adapt as well.  You need to communicate to the organization that your competency models will be changing over time.  Be sure that it doesn’t take an act of Congress for these changes to be made – it has to be part of the cultural understanding that models will adapt and are never “done”.

There are 3 steps to ensure you can adapt your competency model easily. 

1.    Support changes easily.

When you make the model accessible and assessable, your competency assessment system must support making these changes easily.  If it’s too difficult, it won’t happen, and then your competency model will be out of sync with strategy, and out of sync with the skills people need to be successful in their role.  That means the skill gaps you’re measuring won’t be the ones that are most important.

2.    Solicit feedback naturally.

Add a feedback mechanism within your competency assessment tool (and communicate actively that you want feedback) so that you put it out there, you get feedback, and you continue to iterate the model and the behaviors to capture changes in tools, in technology, and in the environment in which you operate.  Have a defined process to do something with the feedback in a timely manner.

3.    Schedule regular reviews

Have a rhythm for periodically re-examining the model for changes.  Maybe 2x/year, or after a transformation, merger or acquisition, or product launch.  Much like the process for creating the competency model, we recommend sending out the tasks and behavioral examples and targets in a Word document (track changes on) to 4 - 6 high performers, and a manager of people in that role.  Give them a few days to review and edit.  Consolidate edits and conduct a 1-2 hour virtual workshop to discuss and finalize updates.  Then make the updates within the competency assessment tool immediately.

If you want people to keep up with the speed of business, you need to be sure you provide them with accurate tools to help them do that.  Follow these steps to ensure your competency models remain current and you will ensure people always know what skills they need to be successful, and what that looks like. 

For more details on creating a competency model, go to https://skilldirector.com/how-to-build-competency-models.

News / Events / Blog Posts | SkillDirector
3 Steps to keep capability models/success profiles flexible and updated

Your competency model should always be in beta.  Competency models describe what someone in a particular role should be able to do to perform their part of corporate strategy.  They paint a picture of what it looks like to be great in a job.  If your strategy is changing regularly (and I believe that for your organization to continue to survive, it will), then your competency model has to change/adapt as well.  You need to communicate to the organization that your competency models will be changing over time.  Be sure that it doesn’t take an act of Congress for these changes to be made – it has to be part of the cultural understanding that models will adapt and are never “done”.

There are 3 steps to ensure you can adapt your competency model easily. 

  1. Support changes easily.

    When you make the model accessible and assessable, your competency assessment system must support making these changes easily.  If it’s too difficult, it won’t happen, and then your competency model will be out of sync with strategy, and out of sync with the skills people need to be successful in their role.  That means the skill gaps you’re measuring won’t be the ones that are most important.

  2. Solicit feedback naturally.

    Add a feedback mechanism within your competency assessment tool (and communicate actively that you want feedback) so that you put it out there, you get feedback, and you continue to iterate the model and the behaviors to capture changes in tools, in technology, and in the environment in which you operate.  Have a defined process to do something with the feedback in a timely manner.

  3. Schedule regular reviews

    Have a rhythm for periodically re-examining the model for changes.  Maybe 2x/year, or after a transformation, merger or acquisition, or product launch.  Much like the process for creating the competency model, we recommend sending out the tasks and behavioral examples and targets in a Word document (track changes on) to 4 - 6 high performers, and a manager of people in that role.  Give them a few days to review and edit.  Consolidate edits and conduct a 1-2 hour virtual workshop to discuss and finalize updates.  Then make the updates within the competency assessment tool immediately.

If you want people to keep up with the speed of business, you need to be sure you provide them with accurate tools to help them do that.  Follow these steps to ensure your competency models remain current and you will ensure people always know what skills they need to be successful, and what that looks like. 

For more details on creating a competency model, go to https://skilldirector.com/how-to-build-competency-models.

 

News / Events / Blog Posts | SkillDirector