Posts tagged Business Goals
How to create a competency model that links individual needs to business goals
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I get asked this question, about how to create a competency model that links individual needs to business goals, quite often.

Start with corporate strategy

Imagine you’re a CEO of a company who has decided the business goal is to develop a flying car.

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Everyone in the company would have an intermediary goal that if accomplished, would lead to the accomplishment of the business goal.  As the goals get translated lower and lower, they become more specialized, until they get to a specific person performing a specific role, for example, an R&D engineer.  To ensure that each R&D engineer can help the company, the company has to define what tasks and skills this person must be able to do really well.  And this is the competency model for this job. 

The competency model describes what it looks like to be great in a role.

Not everything a person does in a role should be part of the competency model tasks or behaviors.  For example, any engineer must be able to perform engineering design functions, but a great engineer can work with other R&D engineers to troubleshoot design issues before they reach manufacturing.  What gets included in the competency model should change with strategy.  For the flying car, knowledge of aerodynamics and new propulsion systems may take precedence over other competencies previously in the model.

Now, an R&D engineer assessing their own skills may identify skill gaps relative to the current business goals, so their personalized learning plan to upskill focuses on development that helps them achieve their part of the business goal.

The competency model links each role to organizational strategy

That is what the competency model does for you – it identifies what someone in a role needs to do to accomplish organizational strategy. So, if you follow this approach, each individual’s self-directed learning will be perfectly aligned with organizational goals.

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How to create a competency model people actually use
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A critical success factor in competency model/capability model development is the ability to have the model written in the language of those who will be using it.  It should NOT be in HR/Learning terms. 

1) Make it easy to consume

Take a step back and look at the model from a holistic approach.  Is it easy to consume?  By that I mean, when you read the competency model behaviors, do you have to read it, then re-read it to know what it means?  Or is it in “easy to read” language – the language of the people using it so they can know what great looks like?  Often we see a good capability model written in a way that is very academic.  The person who is writing it looks very smart, but the capability model itself cannot easily be consumed by the end user.  It should read as people in that role speak.  It should state clearly what someone should be able to do. 

2) Make it manageable

Look at the model from a volume check.  We used to see models between 25 and 40 skills.  Now they trend toward 15-25. 

  • That translates into about 15-25 minutes to perform an assessment. 

  • Keep in mind a manager’s participation when considering volume – if they average 10 direct reports and they are assessing team members, do the math. 

  • A competency model should describe what “great” looks like – what is critical to success in the role – not be a complete task analysis of everything they do. 

3) Keep it focused on what’s critical to success

Look at the model as a professional in that role.  Are there things in it that are extraneous?  For example, do they include tasks that people may do, but are not critical to success in that role or may not be done by some at all?  Sales Transformation and Enablement guru @Mike_Kunkle recommends focusing on what the top 20% do.  Ignore the things they don’t do, which is part of what sets them apart.

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